Travelog

FROM The man in the front seat / July 29, 2013

Eagles Nest – Kehlsteinhaus (Salzburg)

When the Bavarian Nazi Party chairman, Martin Bormann, was looking for something to give Hitler for his fiftieth birthday , he remembered a comment Hitler made whilst walking through the Alps in the southern German state of Bavaria. Hitler pointed to the top of Mt. Kehlstein and said, “wouldn’t it be nice to have a house up there”. In 13 months Bormann had built a chalet on a ridge of Kehlstein at 1834m (6017ft) accessed by a panoramic road 6.5km (4mi), a brass elevator built into the mountain for the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 28, 2013

Schönbrunn Palace and Gardens, Vienna

A highlight of a visit to Vienna is undoubtedly a visit the summer residence of the Hapsburg family – the Schönbrunn Palace. Beginning as a modest hunting lodge, known as Katterburg, in 1548, the Hapsburg monarchs over the course of several hundred years transformed this once simple mansion into a 1,441 room baroque palace. An incredible estate that attracts more than 2.6 million visitors a year. Maximillian II purchased the house and land in 1569 in order to enclose the grounds and fill it with pheasants, ducks, deer & boar […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 26, 2013

Gondolas (Venice)

Gondolas are as much a part of Venice as the Eiffel Tower is a part of Paris. For hundreds of years gondolas have been the principle transport around Venice and the lagoon Venice is located in. In the 17th and 18th century’s it has been estimated that there were between 8,000-10,000 gondolas in the city, today just over 500 are registered with the Venetian government and nearly all of those are used for hire by the tourist who visit the city.The gondolier propels the gondola with a single oar by […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 26, 2013

Piazza San Marco (Venice)

Italy is known for its beautiful piazzas (squares) but there are several that are more well known than the others. Piazza San Marco (St. Marks Square) in Venice certainly falls in that category. The square is surrounded on all four sides of which one of those is the western facade of the Basilica San Marco (St. Marks Basilica). The Offices of the Procurators extend for the entire length of the northside, the Procurators were officers of state during the time of the republic and responsible for protecting the body of […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 24, 2013

Gardens of Augustus – Isle of Capri

The Isle of Capri is the home of several beautiful sights, but without a doubt a must see on the island are the Gardens of Augustus. The gardens are laid out in a series of terraces, overlooking the sea, where the rich local fauna is added to with geraniums, dahlias and brooms. From the gardens you get spectacular views of the Faraglioni Rocks, Marina Piccola and Mount Solaro. German industrialist Friedrich Krupp came to the island in the late 19th century often staying for months at a time at the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 22, 2013

Spanish Steps (Rome)

Rome has many wonderful monuments that are known worldwide , one of those is the Spanish Steps Organised by Étienne Gueffier, the steps were a symbolic creation linking the Spanish Embassy in Piazza di Spagna (which was controlled by the Spanish Bourbon family) to the Trinità dei Monti Church (which was under the French Bourbon patronage). 135 steps link the two areas creating a staircase that was designed by Francesco di Sanctis completing it in 1725. At the base of the stairs, in Piazza de Spagna, is the Fontana della […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 20, 2013

The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Pisa)

Without a doubt one of the most recognisable monuments in Italy. Built as the bell tower for the cathedral it was begun on August 14 1173 with the bell tower being added in 1372. The tower today has a height of 55.86m (183.27ft), with its width at the base being 4.09m (13.42ft) and at the top 2.48m (8.14ft). in total it weighs 14,500 metric tonnes and is accessible through 296 steps. Before the restoration work, which saw the tower closed, in 1990 the tower had a lean of 5.5 degrees […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 18, 2013

Éze Village – views to die for

Sitting up on its little ridge 427m (1401ft) above the Mediterranean, Éze village is without doubt one of the most impressive villages located on the French Riviera. The village is renown for its small shops and art galleries as well as attracting thousands of tourist who come to admire its views of the Mediterranean. It has been proven than man has occupied this site since 2000B.C, anyone who controlled this area has contributed to the history of Èze from the Phonecians, the Turks, the Genoans, the Monaguesqes and now the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 18, 2013

Café Terrace at Night – Vincent van Gogh

In mid September 1888 Vincent Van Gogh painted one of his most iconic scenes – Café Terrace at Night. Also known as – Café Terrace on the Place du Forum the painting now forms part of the Kröller-Müller Museum in Otterlo, the Netherlands. Today, visitors to Place de Forum in the Provençal town of Arles can still stand in the exact location where Vincent set up his easel all those years ago. Vincent, along with others of the impressionist and post-impressionist genre, was infatuated with colour and the effect that […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 14, 2013

Las Meninas – Diego Velásquez

All museums have a showpiece a work that stands out from the rest, for the Prado Museum in Madrid that is Diego Velásquez’s – Las Meninas (the Maids of Honour). During the 1640’s Velásquez was promoted to Royal painter and curator of the then King’s, Phillip IV, expanding art collection. In 1656, after working for the royal house for 33 years, he painted, what is considered one of the most analysed paintings in Western art, Las Meninas. The young princess, Margaret Theresa, is surrounded by her maids of honour, a […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 14, 2013

Burgos Cathedral (Burgos)

Begun in 1221, and in use as a church only 9 years later, the Cathedral of Burgos is one of the most impressive examples of Gothic architecture in Spain. Although inspired by the Cathedrals of Paris & Reims, in France, it also has a feel of the Cathedral in Cologne as 15th century additions where by Juan of Cologne. The building is built with the floor plan of a Latin cross measuring 106m (380ft) long with aisles that containing 15 chapels. Its magnificent western façade is crowned by two 84m […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 12, 2013

Running of the Bulls – San Fermin Festival

The San Fermin Festival is celebrated every year in the city of Pamplona, Spain between 6-14th July. More than a 1 million people crowd into Pamplona during the 9 days to participate in many celebrations but without a doubt the most famous, probably the most famous in Spain, is the Running of the Bulls. Each morning at 8am between 7th – 14th July people run the 825m (0.51m) from the Corralillos to the Plaza de Toros hotly pursued by 6 raging bulls. The event is over within 5min as the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 12, 2013

The Lourdes Grotto – home of the faithful

On the 11 February 1858 a young girl, by the name of Bernadette Soubirous, had a vision of the Virgin Mary revealed herself with the words “I am the immaculate conception”. Bernadette would have 17 more such visions up to 16 July that same year. Four years later the visions where declared authentic by Pope Pius IX in 1862 and thus beginning the veneration of Mary Our Lady of Lourdes. These visions took place in the Massabielle grotto and today, along with other religious sites constructed within the Sanctuary, are […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 10, 2013

Château Chenonceau – The Ladies Château

The Loire Valley is renown for many things but standing head and shoulders above all else are its beautiful chateaus. Chateau Chenonceau would have to be one of the most romantic chateaus located in the Loire, spanning the river Cher, Chenonceau was for almost 100 years the centre of courtly life with numerous parties attracting nobility from not only all over France but all over Europe. Although having been begun in 1411 the Chateau gained it present form from the middle of the 16 century when the King of France, […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 9, 2013

Louvre Pyramid (Paris)

La Pyramid du Louvre was designed by the Chinese-American I.M. Pei, who also is responsible for the National Art Gallery in Washington, The Rock & Roll Museum in Cleveland and the Miho Museum in Japan, and today forms the main entrance to the Louvre Museum. It is located in the Main Courtyard (Cour Napoleon) and was commissioned by Francois Mitterand, the then French President, and took only 5 years to complete being finished in 1989. It was created because the Louvre original main entrance could no longer handle the amount […]

Read more

Subscribe to our newsletter
* = required field
Connect with us
Contact us
Search