Travelog

FROM The man in the front seat / October 4, 2018

Château Chillon, Switzerland

Chateau Chillon, or Chillon Castle, is located on the banks of Lake Geneva in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. It’s spectacular location and wonderful setting make it one of the most visited castles in the country. History Began during the Roman occupation of modern-day Switzerland, the castle was originally built as an outpost guarding the alpine passes the Roman’s. Although no official foundation date is known for the castle we see today, appears in documents from 1005 which mention the castles use in guarding the Great Saint Bernard Pass. By […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / June 14, 2018

Bernina Express, Switzerland

The Bernina Express is a train running from Chur via Davos, in Switzerland through, Poschiavo and into Tirano in Italy. It is an incredibly scenic journey passing through the Engadine Alps and is regarded as one of the most spectacular narrow-gauge railways in the world. This beauty was recognised by UNESCO in 2008 with a large part of the journey being declared a World Heritage Site. The journey is made up of two separate rail lines, the Albula Line and the Bernina Line which both hath their terminus in St. […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / June 14, 2018

The Great Synagogue, Budapest

The Great Synagogue, or the Dohány utcai zsinagóga, located in the Hungarian capital of Budapest, is the largest synagogue in Europe and one of the largest in the world. More than 3000 faithful can fit inside and it is richly decorated, both inside and out. The building was begun in 1854 and only took 5 years to complete, being opened in 1859. It is largely based on Islamic models from North Africa, and medieval Spain. The building’s architect was the Austrian, Ludwig Förster, who claimed that no distinctively Jewish architecture […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 8, 2018

Sanssouci Park, Berlin

Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding the Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, near Berlin. The palace and park were built as a summer palace by Frederick the Great, the King of Prussia. Whilst the palace is impressive, it is renowned for its park, which include numerous temples and other decorations. When the palace was completed a terraced vineyard was added to complete the structure. It was then decided to add a Baroque flower garden and lawns, flowerbeds as well as including trees and hedges. To improve the design more than […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 3, 2018

Palace of Culture & Science, Warsaw

Constructed in 1955, the building is the tallest in Poland and one of the tallest in Europe with a height of 237m (778ft). Although respected, the building is not like by all Varsoviansand as result has numerous nicknames. Pekin (because of its Polish abbreviation PKiN), and Pajac (which means “clown” … sounds similar to Pałac (palace) in Polish) the most common. It s also referred to as Stalin’s syringe, the Elephant in lacy underwear and the Russian wedding cake. History The building was originally known as the Josef Stalin Palace […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 3, 2018

Marchfelderhof, Deutsch-Wagram

In the middle of the Marchfeld plain in Deutsch-Wagram you will find the country inn, Marchfelderhof. History The 13thcentury village of Deutsch-Wagram was a small settlement that would make the headlines on several occasions. Due to its geographical location, the peasants of the Marchfeld had to fight troops who were invading from the east, this included Huns, Avars, Turks, Magyars along with the French and Swedes attacking from the west. There is also, not very far away, the location of the Battle of Jedenspeigen, where in 1278, the Hapsburg dynasty […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 3, 2018

St. Stephens Basilica, Budapest

Named after Saint Stephen of Hungary, the first King of Hungary, the building is the most important ecclesiastical building in the country as well as one of the most visited sights in Budapest. It was originally going to be called St. Leopold, after the patron saint of Austria, but the plan was changed at the very last minute. At 96m (315ft) high it is, along with the parliament building, the tallest structure in the city, in fact, current building regulations forbid the building of any structures taller. History In the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 20, 2018

Hungarian State Opera House, Budapest

Opened: 1884 Capacity: 1261 Located in Budapest, the Hungarian State Opera house is one of the most renowned in Europe. Originally called the Hungarian Royal Opera House, it’s construction began in 1875 to the designs of Miklós Ybl and was financed by the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria-Hungary. Only 9 years were needed to complete the work when it was opened to the public on 27thSeptember 1884. Music in Budapest Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, brought a calmness to her empire that was reflected in a flourishing of the […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 2, 2017

Auschwitz Concentration Camp, Poland

General “Those who do not remember their past are condemned to repeat their mistakes” – George Santayana When the Spanish/American writer George Santayana penned these words, there is no doubt that the events that took place in places like Auschwitz were the “past” he was referring to. Auschwitz actually consisted of three camps, Auschwitz I (the original camp), Auschwitz II – Birkenau (the concentration/extermination camp) and Auschwitz III – Monowitz (a labour camp to staff the IG Farben chemical and pharmaceutical company) Auschwitz was first constructed to hold Polish political […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 2, 2017

Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

In Ireland, a country which is known for its natural beauty, the Cliffs of Moher stand out as one of the highlights of this remarkable isle. Located at the southwestern edge of the Burren Region in County Clare, the cliffs run from just north of O’Brien’s Tower, 8km south to Nags Head. The highest point is at O’Briens Tower which sits at 214m (702ft) above the Atlantic and drop to 120m (390ft) at Nags Head.   Whats in a Name The cliffs take their name from an old fort, which […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / December 1, 2016

Christmas markets – winter is coming

Any visit to Europe over the Christmas period will invariably run into one of the numerous Christmas Markets scattered throughout the continent. Although traditionally associated with the Germanic states, they can now be seen from the Atlantic to the Black Sea. Christmas markets are street markets and normally run for the four weeks of Advent leading up until Christmas. Historically they date back to the late middle ages and traditionally come from areas that were associated with the Holy Roman Empire. at that time this included not only the German […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 11, 2016

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

General Located at the mouth of the river Nivelle, Saint-Jean-de-Luz is one of the most visited place in the French Basque Country with it hugging one side of a sheltered bay. Throughout its history its beauty has attracted Kings and nobles with the highlight being the marriage of Louis XIV of France to Maria-Theresa in 1660. History Saint-Jean has been documented since the 11th century with its sailors hunting Whales off the coast of Labrador in Newfoundland. By the 15 century they had taken control of the cod fisheries which […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 11, 2016

Rias Baixas (Santiago de Compostela)

General The Rias Baixas (Lower Inlets) is a series of four estuaries located in the south-western corner of Galicia and are the grandest and most spectacular of all the inlets that indent the Galician coast. Well known for their spectacular views, beautiful beaches and some wonderful low-key resorts the Rias Baixas is slowly becoming one of the most visited regions in Galicia . The area is also known for providing some of Spain’s most fertile fishing grounds and as a result producing some of the finest seafood in the country. […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 8, 2016

Plaza de América (Seville)

General Plaza America is located in the Parque Maria Luisa (Maria Luis Park) and is flanked by three wonderful buildings; the Museum of Popular Arts, the Archaeological Museum and the Royal Pavillion, which together form Plaza America. History The three buildings, along with the square at the centre, were contructed by Anibel Gonzalez and all built between 1913-1916 for the Ibero-American Fair of 1929. Each building was constructed in a different architectural style that have appeared throughout Spanish history. Highlights Museo de Artes y Costumbres Populares (Museum of Popular Arts) […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 8, 2016

The Royal Chapel (Granada)

General Granada’s most outstanding Christian building is not the cathedral, like in many other Spanish cities, it the Capilla Real (The Royal Chapel). Built in an elaborate Gothic style by the Catholic Monarchs, Isabel and Ferdinand, who wanted to buried on the sight of their greatest victory…The Battle of Granada. History The Nasid dynasty of Granada was the last Mulism domination of Spain to fall to the Reconquista (Reconquest) and it did so in 1492 at the Battle of Granada. In 1504, the Catholic Monarchs, Isabel & Ferdinand, decided that […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 6, 2016

The Albaicin (Granada)

General A must for any visit to Granada, the district is also known as the Albayzin and is the old Muslim district located facing in the Alhambra across the river Darro. Muslim fortifications, houses and fountain still remain as well as many of the Albayzin’s churches and cármenes (large walled villas with gardens) incorporate Islamic remains. The district still maintains its narrow streets and intricate network and as a consequence was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1984 along with the Alhambra Palace. History The name is derived […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / April 6, 2016

Royal Alcázar (Seville)

General Officially known as the Reales Alcázar de Sevilla (Royal Alcazar of Seville) it was originally built by the Muslim kings but today is the royal palace in Seville and still used by the Royal Family when visiting the city as their official residence. The result has been that for more than 1000 years the ruling Kings of Spain have used the Alcázar as their home whilst in Seville. The building is known as being one of the most beautiful palaces in Spain and the oldest palace still in use […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / July 8, 2014

Lake Luzern (Luzern)

Although referred by many as the Lake of Luzern it is technically called the Vierwaldstattersee, the Lake of the Four Forested Cantons. The lake is the fourth largest in Switzerland and is also a complicated shape having seven bays or inlets. It is known for its incredible natural beauty as the shoreline regularly rises steeply into mountains standing more than 1,500m above the lake resulting in spectacular views of Mt. Pilatus, Mt. Rigi and Mt. Stanserhorn Facts It has a total area of 114km² (44mi²) and sits at an elevation […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / June 1, 2014

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberg)

With its incredible location 80m (270ft) up on the northern part of Königstuhl, Heidelberg castle simply dominates the skyline of the old town. A castle, sometimes two, have been located overlooking Heidelberg since 1214, the present structure however was begun at the end of 14th century, probably in 1396. The man who constructed it was Rupert III of Germany and at that time the castle was small, so small in fact that when Rupert was elevated to Emperor of Germany the castle couldn’t accommodate his now large entourage and had […]

Read more

FROM The man in the front seat / May 15, 2014

Trevi Fountain (Rome)

In 19BC Marcus Agrippa, as Consul of Rome, ordered the construction of an aqueduct, Acqua Vergine,  to supply water to the centre of Rome. Legend has it that Roman soldiers were guided by a young girl  to a source of pure water, Salone Springs, some twenty kilometres away from the city. The girl was believed to be a virgin, hence the name of the aqueduct. More than 2000 years later, and after few renovations, water still follows the same path ending in various destinations around Rome. One of these is […]

Read more

Subscribe to our newsletter
* = required field
Connect with us
Contact us
Search