Travelog

FROM The man in the front seat / March 31, 2018

Postiano

Population 3900 General Positano, is a small village located on the Amalfi Coast in southern Italy. Without doubt, it is the most impressive and photogenic of the coast’s villages. The houses, steeply stacked on its near vertical streets, are painted in wonderful colours such as peach and pink and covered with terracotta tiles. Its streets a lined with elegant hotels, fashionable cafes and a plethora of small shops and stalls selling Positano fashions, including their famed Positano Linen. History Positano, was once part of the great Amalfi republic and as […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 20, 2014

David by Michelangelo (Florence)

In the world of sculpture there are certain pieces that stand head and shoulders aboves most others, Michelangelo’s David is certainly one of those. Sculptured between 1501 – 1504 David stands 5.17m (17ft) and represents the biblical hero David, remembered for is fight with Goliath. Today the figure stands alone, in the Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence but was originally one of a series of figures designed to decorate the roofline of the Cathedral in Florence. Authorities decided however to place it in front of the Palazzo della Signoria where it […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 15, 2014

Trevi Fountain (Rome)

In 19BC Marcus Agrippa, as Consul of Rome, ordered the construction of an aqueduct, Acqua Vergine,  to supply water to the centre of Rome. Legend has it that Roman soldiers were guided by a young girl  to a source of pure water, Salone Springs, some twenty kilometres away from the city. The girl was believed to be a virgin, hence the name of the aqueduct. More than 2000 years later, and after few renovations, water still follows the same path ending in various destinations around Rome. One of these is […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 8, 2014

Colosseum

One of the most photographed sites, not only in Italy, but all of Europe is the Colosseum. Officially named the Antiteatro Flavio (Flavian Amphitheatre), it was begun in 70AD and needed only ten year to complete, being finished in 80AD during a period known as the Flavian Dynasty. Considered one of the greatest pieces of Roman architecture and engineering the building is, still today, the largest amphitheatre in the world. In is prime it could hold more than 50,000 spectators and was used for gladiator contests, animal hunts, battle re-enactments […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 6, 2014

Lace and the Sea (Venice)

Venice as a city or more exactly Burano, one of its islands, is renowned for its association with “punto di aria” or needlepoint lace. Althought the arrival of the lace can be traced back to Cyprus that is still no reason to not let a bit of legend make it even clearer. The story goes that a sailor, leaving his fiancée on Burano set out on a voyage only to shipwrecked on an area that was inhabited by mermaids. Bewitched by the mermaids beautiful looks and voices, the rest of […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 6, 2014

Burano Island, Venice

With its population of 2,800, Isola di Burano, or Burano Island in English is actually four islands linked together by a series of bridges and is renowned for its brightly coloured houses, lace stores and wonderful seafood restaurants. Located 7km (4mi) away from St. Marks, the island requires a 40min private vaporetti ride (or 2 hours by public water bus) through the picturesque Venetian lagoon. History Like many other islands in the lagoon, Burano is believed to of been inhabited since Roman times, well before the present Venetians arrived at […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / February 17, 2014

San Gimignano

Pop.: 8000 When you close your eyes and think of Tuscany you’re probably thinking of San Gimignano. Perched up on the crest of a hill and surrounded by vineyards and olive groves, the town with its 14 towers (once were 72) reminds the visitor of a medieval Manhattan. History Like many hilltop towns in Italy, San Gimignano was once an Etruscan town and according to legend was founded by two brothers, Muzio and Silvio, in 63 B.C. who were fleeing Rome after being implicated in a conspiracy. The town’s name, […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / February 11, 2014

Aperol – I must be in Venice

Created in 1919 by the Barbieri Company which  is based in Padua, Italy. Aperol has become one of the most popular Italian aperitifs of all time. After a relatively slow start Aperol’s unique combination of bitter orange, gentian, rhubarb and cinchona (a plant native to South America) has sky rocketed in popularity since WWII. Looking a little like Campari (in fact its owned by the Campari company today), Aperol is only half it’s alcohol content at 11% and much more pale in colour. Aperol is sold in Germany however its […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 26, 2013

Gondolas (Venice)

Gondolas are as much a part of Venice as the Eiffel Tower is a part of Paris. For hundreds of years gondolas have been the principle transport around Venice and the lagoon Venice is located in. In the 17th and 18th century’s it has been estimated that there were between 8,000-10,000 gondolas in the city, today just over 500 are registered with the Venetian government and nearly all of those are used for hire by the tourist who visit the city.The gondolier propels the gondola with a single oar by […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 26, 2013

Piazza San Marco (Venice)

Italy is known for its beautiful piazzas (squares) but there are several that are more well known than the others. Piazza San Marco (St. Marks Square) in Venice certainly falls in that category. The square is surrounded on all four sides of which one of those is the western facade of the Basilica San Marco (St. Marks Basilica). The Offices of the Procurators extend for the entire length of the northside, the Procurators were officers of state during the time of the republic and responsible for protecting the body of […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 24, 2013

Gardens of Augustus – Isle of Capri

The Isle of Capri is the home of several beautiful sights, but without a doubt a must see on the island are the Gardens of Augustus. The gardens are laid out in a series of terraces, overlooking the sea, where the rich local fauna is added to with geraniums, dahlias and brooms. From the gardens you get spectacular views of the Faraglioni Rocks, Marina Piccola and Mount Solaro. German industrialist Friedrich Krupp came to the island in the late 19th century often staying for months at a time at the […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 22, 2013

Spanish Steps (Rome)

Rome has many wonderful monuments that are known worldwide , one of those is the Spanish Steps Organised by Étienne Gueffier, the steps were a symbolic creation linking the Spanish Embassy in Piazza di Spagna (which was controlled by the Spanish Bourbon family) to the Trinità dei Monti Church (which was under the French Bourbon patronage). 135 steps link the two areas creating a staircase that was designed by Francesco di Sanctis completing it in 1725. At the base of the stairs, in Piazza de Spagna, is the Fontana della […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 20, 2013

The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Pisa)

Without a doubt one of the most recognisable monuments in Italy. Built as the bell tower for the cathedral it was begun on August 14 1173 with the bell tower being added in 1372. The tower today has a height of 55.86m (183.27ft), with its width at the base being 4.09m (13.42ft) and at the top 2.48m (8.14ft). in total it weighs 14,500 metric tonnes and is accessible through 296 steps. Before the restoration work, which saw the tower closed, in 1990 the tower had a lean of 5.5 degrees […]

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