Travelog / Optional Experiences

FROM The man in the front seat / June 14, 2018

The Great Synagogue, Budapest

The Great Synagogue, or the Dohány utcai zsinagóga, located in the Hungarian capital of Budapest, is the largest synagogue in Europe and one of the largest in the world. More than 3000 faithful can fit inside and it is richly decorated, both inside and out. The building was begun in 1854 and only took 5 years to complete, being opened in 1859. It is largely based on Islamic models from North Africa, and medieval Spain. The building’s architect was the Austrian, Ludwig Förster, who claimed that no distinctively Jewish architecture […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 8, 2018

Sanssouci Park, Berlin

Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding the Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, near Berlin. The palace and park were built as a summer palace by Frederick the Great, the King of Prussia. Whilst the palace is impressive, it is renowned for its park, which include numerous temples and other decorations. When the palace was completed a terraced vineyard was added to complete the structure. It was then decided to add a Baroque flower garden and lawns, flowerbeds as well as including trees and hedges. To improve the design more than […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 3, 2018

Palace of Culture & Science, Warsaw

Constructed in 1955, the building is the tallest in Poland and one of the tallest in Europe with a height of 237m (778ft). Although respected, the building is not like by all Varsoviansand as result has numerous nicknames. Pekin (because of its Polish abbreviation PKiN), and Pajac (which means “clown” … sounds similar to Pałac (palace) in Polish) the most common. It s also referred to as Stalin’s syringe, the Elephant in lacy underwear and the Russian wedding cake. History The building was originally known as the Josef Stalin Palace […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 3, 2018

Marchfelderhof, Deutsch-Wagram

In the middle of the Marchfeld plain in Deutsch-Wagram you will find the country inn, Marchfelderhof. History The 13thcentury village of Deutsch-Wagram was a small settlement that would make the headlines on several occasions. Due to its geographical location, the peasants of the Marchfeld had to fight troops who were invading from the east, this included Huns, Avars, Turks, Magyars along with the French and Swedes attacking from the west. There is also, not very far away, the location of the Battle of Jedenspeigen, where in 1278, the Hapsburg dynasty […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / February 7, 2018

Wieliczka Salt Mines, Krakow

Located in the southern Polish town of Wieliczka, the Wieliczka Salt mine was opened in the 13th century and run continuously until 2007. Not only is it one of the world’s oldest salt mines, it is also one of the world’s largest. Today the mine is one of Poland’s Pomniki historii (Historic Monuments) and is noted for its 4 chapels, carved out by the miners over the centuries. The mine itself reaches a depth of 326m (1075ft) and is over 287km (180mi) in length. History Rock salt was discovered in […]

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