Travelog / Optional Experiences

FROM The man in the front seat / July 8, 2014

Lake Luzern (Luzern)

Although referred by many as the Lake of Luzern it is technically called the Vierwaldstattersee, the Lake of the Four Forested Cantons. The lake is the fourth largest in Switzerland and is also a complicated shape having seven bays or inlets. It is known for its incredible natural beauty as the shoreline regularly rises steeply into mountains standing more than 1,500m above the lake resulting in spectacular views of Mt. Pilatus, Mt. Rigi and Mt. Stanserhorn Facts It has a total area of 114km² (44mi²) and sits at an elevation […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 15, 2014

Trevi Fountain (Rome)

In 19BC Marcus Agrippa, as Consul of Rome, ordered the construction of an aqueduct, Acqua Vergine,  to supply water to the centre of Rome. Legend has it that Roman soldiers were guided by a young girl  to a source of pure water, Salone Springs, some twenty kilometres away from the city. The girl was believed to be a virgin, hence the name of the aqueduct. More than 2000 years later, and after few renovations, water still follows the same path ending in various destinations around Rome. One of these is […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 8, 2014

Colosseum (Rome)

One of the most photographed sites, not only in Italy, but all of Europe is the Colosseum. Officially named the Antiteatro Flavio (Flavian Amphitheatre), it was begun in 70AD and needed only ten year to complete, being finished in 80AD during a period known as the Flavian Dynasty. Considered one of the greatest pieces of Roman architecture and engineering the building is, still today, the largest amphitheatre in the world. In is prime it could hold more than 50,000 spectators and was used for gladiator contests, animal hunts, battle re-enactments […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 8, 2014

The Louvre (Paris)

With more the 60,600m² (652,300ft²) of floor space make the Louvre the one of the largest Museums in the world. As a result almost 10 million people visit each year to admire some of the 380,000 objects the museum has in its collection. The Building When people think of museums they normally think of stale, sterile almost hospital like structures, no in Paris. The Louvre is housed in the Louvre Palace, a fortress begun in the 12th century by the then King Phillip II and once residence of the King […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 6, 2014

Burano Island, Venice

With its population of 2,800, Isola di Burano, or Burano Island in English is actually four islands linked together by a series of bridges and is renowned for its brightly coloured houses, lace stores and wonderful seafood restaurants. Located 7km (4mi) away from St. Marks, the island requires a 40min private vaporetti ride (or 2 hours by public water bus) through the picturesque Venetian lagoon. History Like many other islands in the lagoon, Burano is believed to of been inhabited since Roman times, well before the present Venetians arrived at […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / May 6, 2014

Moulin Rouge (Paris)

Paris at the end of the 19th century was a place full of progress and optimism, industry was booming to the point where World Fairs were held in 1889, with unveiling of the Eiffel Tower and again in 1900, which gave us the expresso machine. This period in France would be later referred to ask Belle Époque or in English the “Beautiful Era” Origins It was in this atmosphere that on 6th October 1889, the Moulin Rouge opened in the Jardin de Paris at the base of Montmartre on the […]

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FROM The man in the front seat / July 9, 2013

Louvre Pyramid (Paris)

La Pyramid du Louvre was designed by the Chinese-American I.M. Pei, who also is responsible for the National Art Gallery in Washington, The Rock & Roll Museum in Cleveland and the Miho Museum in Japan, and today forms the main entrance to the Louvre Museum. It is located in the Main Courtyard (Cour Napoleon) and was commissioned by Francois Mitterand, the then French President, and took only 5 years to complete being finished in 1989. It was created because the Louvre original main entrance could no longer handle the amount […]

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